Archive for the ‘Experience Report’ Category

Note: This post first appeared on Pagero’s blog

One of the questions that Kent Beck asked when he was developing the eXtreme Programming development methodology, was what happens if we turn the dials up all the way to 10? Take a practice we know is good, and do more of it? Practices like Test-Driven Development and Pair Programming are what he came up with, starting from manual testing and code review.

In the same way, Continuous Delivery is what you get if you turn the dials to 10 on your annual release cycle. You get to the point that you are pushing out new code to users, many times a day.

“Shortening the release cycle like this has a lot of advantages, especially around risk and quality.”

LOWER RISK AND HIGHER QUALITY WITH SHORTER RELEASE CYCLES

Shortening the release cycle like this has a lot of advantages, especially around risk and quality. Basically, you’re decreasing the batch size, a well-known tenet of lean manufacturing. If each new release contains fewer changes, then you have fewer places to look when things go wrong, so finding bugs is easier. You also lower the risk that any individual batch has a defect in the first place. By having an engineering setup that allows you to make code changes at the drop of a hat and push them out to production easily, you facilitate getting fixes out quickly.

So the upshot is quality problems surface sporadically instead of all at once, and are more easily dealt with. It’s an attractive prospect for us, especially with the growth in traffic we’re experiencing. Every time we have a defect in production, it affects a proportion of our customers, and the number of customers is increasing all the time. If we had a small bug a year ago that affected one or two customers, today the same bug might affect tens or even hundreds.

FROM MONOLITH TO MICROSERVICES FOR GREATER FLEXIBILITY

At Pagero, historically we’ve been pushing out a new version of our product “Pagero Online”, about once a month. We’ve been able to sustain that since about 2007. So when we began looking at Continuous Delivery, about three years ago, we were starting from a fairly good position. We’ve experienced steady growth in transactions through our cloud platform since the start, and it was in early 2014 we started switching over our architecture from a clustered monolithic JEE instance, to distributed microservices (see my previous article).

We needed to do this, in order to scale out our system horizontally, and handle the increasing traffic. One of the other benefits of microservices though, is you can deploy services independently of one another, and if you do it right, you can deploy new code without stopping traffic to the site.

“One of the other benefits of microservices, is you can deploy services independently of one another.”

FROM MONTHLY SERVICE WINDOWS ON SUNDAYS…

Our old monthly release cycle was based on having a ‘service window’, usually on a Sunday morning, where we could stop all the traffic, take a backup of the database, roll out the new version of the monolith, then bring everything back up again. You’ve got the database backup to fall back on, if something goes wrong with the update. You can easily roll everything back to the state it had before the service window.

…TO SEVERAL ROLLOUTS A WEEK

So of course, initially the microservices we had were fairly peripheral to the main function of our platform, and it wasn’t a huge risk to roll out new code without the safety of a service window. So we built deployment tools that allowed us to do that. All our microservices run with at least two instances, so an update consisted of taking each instance down in turn, replacing it with the new version. If something goes wrong, it’s not hard to roll back to a previous version. It’s a little more problematic to restore previous state, but generally we have good mechanisms to re-submit failed transactions once the service is working again.

So these days we roll out new versions of our microservices several times a week, when new features are ready, and rarely have any difficulties with this. The need to roll back does occur occasionally, but more often we can ‘roll-forward’ and deploy a newer version with a fix.

“These days we roll out new versions of our microservices several times a week, when new features are ready.”

MANY REASONS TO CONTINUE ON THIS PATH

With our former monolith, the situation is a little different though. Any changes that touch the database are deemed too risky to deploy without first taking a backup, and that currently requires a service window. We’ve got so used to frequently pushing out new versions of the microservices, and seen the benefits of that, that we’d like to do the same with the former monolith.

We also have good business reasons for wanting to release without having a service window – for a start our traffic is growing at such a rate, we can ill afford any downtime. Perhaps more importantly, as we get customers in more parts of the world, a Sunday morning is no longer a ‘quiet’ time of the week when it’s relatively ok to suspend our service. In some Arab countries where we do business, Sunday is the first day of the working week.

THE SHIFT TO CONTINUOUS DELIVERY HAS STARTED

Now we’ve gained some experience with Continuous Delivery of our microservices, it’s time to do the same with the whole Pagero Online platform, including our old monolith. So I look forward to being able to soon report that we’ve got the dials going all the way up to 10 and we are deploying any part of our system at any time.

 

Please note: this article was originally published on Pagero’s site.

At Pagero we are very proud of the technical architecture of our flagship product, Pagero Online. We’re successfully handling more document transactions than ever, as we see an ever increasing demand for e-document services. In this article I’d like to tell you a little about the journey we’ve taken, from humble beginnings almost ten years ago, to the present day and beyond. I’ll be talking a little about the technology stack we’ve chosen, including the business and technical reasoning behind our choices. If you’ve ever worked on a high availability, cloud based platform handling millions of events, or aspire to do so, you could be interested in our story.

This spring I was at the Craft conference in Budapest, which I thoroughly recommend by the way. There was a full program, with lot of great sessions, and interesting speakers. I did notice, browsing the program beforehand, that there were a lot of talks about Microservices, and Docker. Everyone seemed to have an opinion on the best deployment options, how to manage distributed data, building, testing, logging… This is clearly the hip and trendy way to build systems these days. I found this quite gratifying, since at Pagero we’ve been using a Microservices architecture for some time now, and have been using Docker in production since early 2014. It’s become our everyday life, not some hyped trend that we just heard about. Our reasons for going with Docker and Microservices are firmly rooted in the needs of our business.

Let me explain. Pagero Online is a cloud-based platform for exchange of electronic documents between businesses, for example invoices and orders. The point is, our customers can send their documents to us in whatever format their internal system produces, and we will deliver it in the format the recipient finds easiest to process in their internal systems. It’s clearly a valuable service, since we have an impressive year on year growth in document transactions.

The growth illustrates the challenge we’ve been meeting successfully for several years now – to scale our cloud system to handle ever increasing traffic. It’s of course a great problem to have, and we in the R&D department have worked hard to keep everything running smoothly throughout. The architecture we had when we started, is not the architecture we have now.

IN THE BEGINNING

Back in 2007, Enterprise Java Beans were the thing to do, and we felt confident we were building a future-proof, scalable system, using a JBoss container talking to a PostgreSQL database. Moore’s law meant that we could initially scale just by buying a bigger machine now and then. As time went by, we needed more, and started using the clustering capabilities built into the J2EE platform – i.e. several instances of the same code, receiving requests via a load balancer. At some point in about 2012 we realized this approach could no longer handle the increase in traffic that we were experiencing. We could no longer just add new instances of the same code, the slowdown from the communication overhead between them would be greater than the speedup from the increased CPU power. We needed to give more CPU power to just a few parts of the code that were doing the most intensive processing, without also hitting the communication bottlenecks.

ENTER MICROSERVICES AND DOCKER

Everything was pointing to a need to break apart our monolith into more manageable pieces. Microservices and Docker seemed the perfect match to our problems, so we spent the next year or so building the infrastructure needed. In February 2014 we deployed our monolith, packaged in a Docker container, together with some essential services for monitoring, service discovery, and message passing, (with protobuf over Rabbit MQ). Over the following months, the whole of our R&D department completed a course in the Scala programming language, and we built and deployed several more services for new features in the system. It worked! Since 2014 we have been able to quickly grow to about twenty services a year later, and sixty today.

We’ve realized the Microservices architecture enabled organizational streamlining too. Over the years our development team has grown from a handful of developers in the same room, to about 30 people split across three time zones. By breaking up the codebase, we can also divide up the development work more efficiently. We now have half a dozen ‘devops’ teams each responsible for a handful of Microservices. Both new and seasoned developers are more productive when working in these smaller codebases.

SCALING THE DATABASE

It was in around mid-2015, however, we started to see where the bottleneck had moved to, now the application code was performing better. Our trusty PostgreSQL database was handling a good many more gigabytes of data than ever before, and some transactions were getting a little slow. We concocted a plan to split it up too, just like we were doing with the monolith of code. We settled upon Cassandra and worked out how we were going to safely migrate all the document data out of Postgres, and into this distributed data store. The rest of the data will remain where it is, but just taking out the documents should free up a good deal of space, and release the main bottleneck. We of course need to do this without disrupting our service in any way, so one way to reduce the risk is to run the new Cassandra database in parallel with the existing Postgres, duplicating all the data. Only once we’ve done extensive testing, and we can see it’s working ok, will we remove the redundant copy

That’s kind of where we are now, we have just started this parallel running, and initial results are looking good.

THE BIG BREAK-UP

The next challenge is to continue to break apart our monolith of code, and create new services out of the pieces. Although all our new features are being built in Microservices, we still have the heart of the system in the former monolith. We’ve seen so many benefits to having Microservices, we’d like all our code to look like that. In some ways it’s a more daunting prospect than breaking up the database. This is a large quantity of tried and tested code that has been running in production for many years – breaking it up is not something you can do over a weekend!

We have to make this big change without any interruption to our production service, and we’ve thought carefully about what our strategy should be. One way to do a big risky change is to split it into a series of less-risky, smaller changes. The idea is that after every step in the break up, to run a battery of automated regression tests. The shorter the time the tests take to run, the smaller increments we can work with, and less risk of breaking anything. I’m personally pretty excited by this prospect. We’ve spent several years now building and improving our automated tests for Pagero Online, to the point where we feel pretty confident in taking on this challenge.

The other part of the strategy is to do the same as we have with the database migration. We’ll run both the old and new versions of the service in production for a while before we cut over to the new one. This should find any issues missed by the automated tests, without affecting any of our production traffic.

It’s going to be a real proof of how good our testing and deployment routines are. What kind of tests and deployment tools we’ve built, now that’s a topic for another blog post. If I’m lucky, I might even be telling you about the hip and trendy hot technologies that will be all over the agenda of the next Craft conference :-).

Last week I met Woody Zuill when he came to Göteborg to give a workshop about Mob Programming.  At first glance mobbing seems really innefficient. You have a whole team of maybe 6-7 people sitting together all day, every day, programming at one computer. How could that possibly be a productive way to work?

I’m pretty intrigued by the idea. It reminds me of the reaction people had to eXtreme Programming when they first heard about it back in like 2000. Is it just an off-putting name for something that could actually be quite brilliant? There are certainly some interesting people who I respect, talking warmly about it. The thing is, when it comes to working together with others, programming at one computer, I’ve had some mixed results. Sometimes good, sometimes less good.

I’ve done some pair programming, and found it worked well with some people and not others. It’s generally worked much better when I’ve paired with someone who has a lot of useful knowledge that I’ve lacked. Either about the language and frameworks we’re using, or about how the software will be used – ie the problem domain. I’ve found it’s worked a lot less well in other situations, with other people. I find it all too easy to hog the keyboard, basically. So I do pair, but not that often.

With ‘Randori’ style coding dojos, the idea is that you have a pair at the front who code, and switch one person every 5-7 minutes, or every test case. I’ve facilitated a lot of these sessions, and I find them especially useful for quickly getting a group of people new to TDD all up and running and pointed in the same direction. Recently I’ve been doing it only for the first session or two, instead having everyone working in pairs most of the time. As a facilitator, this is far easier to handle – much less stressful. Managing the interactions in a bigger group is difficult, both to keep the discussions on track, answer questions about the exercise, and to maintain the pair switching. I also find the person at the keyboard easily gets stressed and intimidated by having everyone watching them, and often writes worse code than they are capable of. So I do facilitate whole-group Randori sessions, but not that often.

So I wanted to find out if mob programming had similar strengths and weaknesses. In what situations does it excel, and when are you better off pairing or working alone? Would I find it stressful, like a Randori? Would I want to drive most of the time, as in pair programming?

Woody turns out to be a really gentle person, about as far away from a ‘hard sell’ as you can get. He facilitaed the session masterfully, mixing theory and practice, telling us stories about what he’s found to work and why. I am confident he knows a lot about software development in general, mob programming in particular, and he is very humble about it.

The most important insight I gained from the session, was that I need to get good at ‘strong-style pairing’. That seems to me to be at the heart of what makes Mob programming work, and not be stressful like the Randori sessions I’ve been doing. I think it will also help me to get pair programming to work well in a wider variety of situations.

I have heard about ‘strong-style pairing’ before, from Llewellyn Falco, who invented it, but I havn’t really experienced it very much before, or understood how important it is. Do go read his blog post about it, for a fuller explanation of what I’m talking about.

The basic idea is “For an idea to go from your head into the computer it MUST go through someone else’s hands”. That forces you to express your ideas really clearly, in words, first. That is actually pretty difficult when you havn’t done it much before. The thing is, that if you do that, then you open up your programming ideas for discussion, critique, and improvement, in a way that doesn’t happen if they go straight from your head through your own hands into the computer. I think if I get better at ‘strong-style pairing’ it will help me not only with Mob programming, but also with pairing and facilitating Randori dojo sessions. Probably also with programming generally.

Pairing has worked best for me when I’ve been driving, and my navigator is good at expressing ideas for me to understand and then type. I think I need to get good at that navigator role for the times when I’m the one with more ideas. I need to learn that when I think ‘I have an idea about to solve this problem!’ I should hand over the keyboard, not grab it. I need to learn to express my coding ideas verbally. Then I will be able to pair productively with a wider range of people.

Randori sessions are much less stressful if the driver has less to do. If the responsibility is shared more evenly with the Navigator, then I think everyone will write better code. As a facilitator, I have less group dynamics to worry about if the designated navigator is in control, and everyone else talks less. (Woody advised that, at least at first, you should ban anyone else in the mob from giving the Driver ideas about what to type, so the Navigator learns the role.)

So thanks, Woody, for taking the time to come to Göteborg, sharing your experiences and facilitating a great workshop. I learnt a lot, and I think Mob Programming and Strong-style pairing could quite possibly be some of those brilliant ideas that change the way I write code, for the better.

I was recently at the Software Craftsmanship Conference at Bletchley Park in the UK. This is a one-day conference for software developers, attended by around 150 programmers. All proceeds from the event go to support Bletchley Park, which is of historical interest to programmers in particular – the site where Alan Turing and others cracked the enigma code in the 2nd world war. It was the fifth time this conference has been run, and the first time I attended. This is a short experience report.

In the morning I ran a workshop titled “Outside-In, with or without Mocks?“. We were about 50 people in the Ballroom in the Mansion, a very grand room, and it was really great to see so many people working in pairs at laptops, puzzling over some code and tests and how to do Test Driven Development. We were looking at a code kata I’ve designed called “Train Reservation“. It’s in no way a beginner exercise, and the crowd at Bletchley seemed to get on with it rather well on the whole. I’m just sorry I didn’t get round to talk to each pair very often, with 24 pairs I only had a couple of conversations with each during the 2 hour session!

I set up the exercise more or less to force people to use some kind of mock, fake or stub to replace the Booking Reference Service and the Train Data Service, because I am interested in how different people use these. I’ve observed that some programmers avoid using test doubles whenever possible, while others use them frequently. I’ve also observed that some people prefer to work outside-in, starting with a guiding test, while others prefer to start with the business rules at the heart of the problem and work outwards from there. At this particular workshop, there were all sorts of approaches being used. Some started with the guiding test and stubbed the services. Others started with the business logic around the seat selection rules. Different approaches, as I had hoped! Overall I feel encouraged that this exercise is a useful one, and people seemed to get on better with it than the last time I ran it, at XP2013. It’s till rather too big of a problem to tackle in a half day workshop though. I’ll be updating it some more before I run it again, although I don’t have any fixed plans for when that will be yet.

In the afternoon, I went to a session by Ivan Moore and Mike Hill, “Inheritance to Composition“. They gave us a demo of this particular refactoring using a very simple codebase, before launching us into a much more complex one – Fitnesse (starting from the branch “revised-ResponderFactory”). The idea was to take some classes that were using Inheritance – specifically the Template Method pattern – and convert them to instead use Composition – specifically the Strategy pattern. They also helpfully provided us with a sheet of instructions – 6 steps to complete the refactoring with minimal risk and code breakage.

My pair and I got on fairly well with the refactoring, and by the end of the session we were on step 5 with the goal in sight. The experience was of using Eclipse’s refactoring tools extensively, and relying a great deal on the compiler. The tests we had to lean on took a minute and a half to run, and actually, the tests for the classes we were working on were more mini-integration tests than unit tests as such. It meant there were relatively few updates to the tests as we did the refactoring, but the feedback loop was slow. I thought that was really interesting, and was wondering how the experience of the refactoring would change in a language like Python. There you don’t have a compiler, or very much help from refactoring tools.

So after the workshop, I set about trying to construct a similar problem in Python. Perhaps understandably, I didn’t want to translate the whole of Fitnesse to Python, (!), so I tried to re-write only the elements of it essential to this exercise. You can have a look at what I’ve come up with in my new repo “WikiSearchKata“. I’m still working on preparing this properly as an exercise, (the instructions are still rather thin), but I plan to try it out at a GothPy meeting sometime soon.

After the conference sessions had ended, we were treated to a guided tour of the National Museum of Computing which was for me, the highlight of the day! Our enthusiastic guide showed us all sorts of ancient computers and storage devices and punch cards… a few I recognized from my childhood. My dad used to bring home old punch cards and my mum used to write her shopping lists on them when she went to the supermarket. They had a 48K ZX spectrum with rubber keys – just the same as the one I wrote my first program on! They had a CRAY supercomputer similar to the one I remember seeing once when I visited my dad’s work as a child. It’s a similar size to (the outside view of) a Tardis, with a big red button on the front. I don’t think we found out what the red button does, but the guide did say we probably have more computing power in the smartphone in our pocket! I found the changes in storage capacity actually even more impressive. They had these washing-machine sized boxes and dinner-plate sized metal disks that together made a hard drive. I think it held something like 4K.

The highlight of the tour was the WITCH computer – the oldest working computer in the world. It was brilliant! You could actually see what it was doing while it read in a paper tape punched with holes – the program – and loaded values into registries and did calculations. It made this fantastic whirring noise as it ran, and has all these little whizzy flashing lights. It works in decimal rather than binary, so each number is represented by a little “dekatron” – a glass tube with a red light inside, that moves between positions 0-9 in a circle. So you can read which number is in the registry by looking at the position of each light in the array. They also had this little button you could press to make it step through the program one instruction at a time. I got to press it, and single-step a computer from 1951!

Compared with other conferences I’ve been too, this one was rather short, just one day, and with rather long sessions – half or whole day. It was hard work coding and facilitating all day, but in general very interesting people and coding exercises. A second day would have made it more worthwhile my making the trip. In any case, my thanks to Jon Dickinson for organizing it.

Last week I was in Oxford at “Iverson College”, which is a conference on the topic of Array Language Programming. There were about 25 programmers there, most of whom are expert in one or more of APL, J, K, or Q. It’s not my usual comfort zone, put it that way! I’m fairly competent with a number of programming languages, notably Python and Java, but nothing I know is really much like these array languages. It’s been a huge culture shock, but in a good way, I think.

My main discoveries are that Array Programming is different again from Object Oriented Programming and Functional Programming, (although it has a lot in common with functional programming), and that this community contains some exceptional programmers. The total number of array language programmers is however extremely small and their work seems to be pretty much unknown to the wider programming community.

Array Programming Languages
I mentioned before four languages, APL, J, K and Q. They are similar to each other, kind of like Ruby and Python are similar to each other. I’ve gone through an introductory training in each language this week, largely given by the language designers themselves. I’d like to relate a little of what I’ve discovered about them.

APL
This is the oldest of the array languages, invented by Ken Iverson in the 1960s. It’s notorious for using an alphabet of funny-looking symbols to represent the built-in functions. You can try it out at http://tryapl.org – an interactive REPL (Read-Evaluate-Print-Loop) where you can put in snippets of code and see what the symbols do.

I thought at first that APL looked really intimidating and unnecessarily weird. Now having got to know it a little, I can see the benefits to the little symbols. They make the code really concise and unambiguous, and it doesn’t take long to learn their names. Once you can pronounce each symbol in your head as you read the code, it’s not much different from writing out the names in full in the editor.

The variant of APL that most of the conference attendees use is produced by the company Dyalog. I first met the CTO, Morten Kromberg, at an XP conference in 2006. He’s shown me some APL before, but this time I really got a chance to sit down with him and look at how he writes code. Dyalog APL has a powerful IDE including a REPL, where Morten showed me how he plays around with data and code, in order to come up with some useful APL expressions. When he’d got something working, he transfers code from the REPL into a file, to make it re-usable and shareable. It’s a familiar way of working to me, many Python programmers code this way, flipping between the REPL and a script file. It was a real pleasure to code with Morten – he is an extremely skilled programmer. Dyalog APL looks nice too, it has a fully-fledged IDE, and interfaces with .Net, Excel spreadsheets, ASP.net and more. It would fit nicely into the technology stack of many IT departments basically.

J
This was Ken Iverson’s next language, created together with Roger Hui, who now continues development of it. J is similar to APL in many ways, but is open source, and uses only ASCII characters. They’ve made an effort to make it open and less intimidating to newcomers, and probably for that reason, it’s the one I chose to download and try to learn before the conference.

I met Roger at breakfast on the first day of the conference, knowing nothing about who he was, he just said he was a programmer. I confessed that I’d downloaded J and made some joke about hoping I’d get on better with it than Ron Jeffries. (Ron wrote articles in his blog, about his efforts to learn J, and later gave up, finding it too hard!). Roger genuinely didn’t know who Ron Jeffries is, although he did know of the agile manifesto. He was very kind and concerned to help me to understand J though, (and Ron, if he wants!)

Despite my head start with J, by the end of the conference I found APL code easier to grasp – J seems more extreme to me. Roger calls J “executable mathematical notation”, and I’ve always been a bit more of an engineer than a mathematician.

K
K was invented by Arthur Whitney, who was also at the conference. I didn’t really get a feel for how the language works, more than that it’s extremely terse.

Arthur gave a talk at the conference, about his new project, KOS. He and two other guys are writing an operating system pretty much from scratch, using K, C, and bits of the linux kernel, (although they’d like to remove those). He showed us how you write applications for this new OS in K, by demonstrating building a text editor. He began from the alpha version of the OS with just a window manager, and a plain new window canvas that didn’t respond to any keyboard or mouse events.

Arthur added a line of K code to let you enter text into the window – a listener to key presses. Then a line of code to move the caret around with the arrow keys. Then a line of code for changing the font size. Then scrolling. Code to handle Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V to copy and paste text…. in the space of less than half an hour, he had an equivalent to notepad working. No compilation, no reloading. And the code was…. phenomenal. You can see a version of it here. I can’t read it really, it looks mostly like line noise to me. All his variable and function names are one or two characters, and K just seems pathologically terse.

I raised my hand and asked Arthur if he thought his code would be more readable if he used longer variable names? He thought for a moment, looking surprised and a little bewildered by the question. Then shook his head and said slowly “No. no. I don’t think I need that. I want to see all my code on the screen at once”. Needless to say, that was a big culture shock moment for me!

The size of the codebase is something all the array language programmers seem really concerned about, even if Arthur’s code is considered extreme even in that community. One thing I did later that week was take a piece of code that is in Robert C. Martin’s book “Clean Code”  (Args.java), as an example of clean Java code, and showed it to the group. There were general exclamations of “aargghh! that hurts my eyes!” but after a little while as I explained the structure of the code they seemed to appreciate it a little better. What they did say that intrigued me though, was that they automatically scanned the page looking for the symbols – the >, !, = signs – the parts that do something, as they put it. The other text they said obscures the structure, it distracts the eye. Yes, that’s right. Having names for the functions and variables makes the code less readable.

KDB+ and Q
KDB+ is a very small and fast commercial database largely used by financial institutions, also originally created by Arthur Whitney. Q is a kind of domain specific language built on top of K, that you use to query the data in a KDB+ instance.

I sat down with Attila Vrabecz, an experienced Q and KDB+ programmer, and we coded together for a couple of hours. We tackled a problem I’d previously coded with Morten in APL, to help me see what was different. There were many similarities – the workflow was the same for example – experimenting in the REPL before transferring the code into a more permanent, reusable form. I noticed Q has many more English words in it, fewer strange symbols, and Attila made more use of library functions than Morten did. It seems Q is designed to be approachable for a former SQL programmer, although once you scratch the surface, it’s much more like APL than SQL.

Test-Driven Development
I gave a talk at the conference about TDD. My aim was to provoke discussion, and argued that writing automated tests using TDD is the best approach. I was definitely successful at sparking a discussion! Actually, it didn’t seem the idea that programmers should write automated tests for their code was all that controversial, especially amongst the more seasoned developers present. We got way more hung up on how large a chunk of code counts as a “unit”, for your unit test, and what clean code looks like in an array language. To my eye, their units are large and their clean code is terse.

A challenge for the future
Dave Thomas, former lead developer for the Eclipse project, and general software visionary, is also an APL and K programmer. He flew in for just one day of the conference, and his talk functioned as the keynote address for the week – it was a clear challenge to the Array Languages community.

Dave painted a vision for the future where people will be living in a sea of big data they don’t understand, and lack adequate tools to query. He sees a great opportunity for array languages, which are generally very good at handling large amounts of data.

He ended his talk with an ambitious challenge to this community to get its act together, start being seen as a credible alternative, and grow. I could only applaud and agree – I found his advice insightful, and I hope the array languages community will do as he suggests.

I spent one very pleasant evening chatting with a woman who is about to embark on her PhD in atmospheric science. She’s hoping to use array languages to help her create software models that will execute quickly on huge arrays of multi-dimensional climate data. Her work sounds fascinating, and I hope it’s a sign of array languages starting to be used beyond their traditional niche in finance.

So I’m leaving the conference carrying a huge tome entitled “A complete introduction to Dyalog APL”, some pieces of code I’ve written, and good intentions to study further. I do find it fascinating that even with the little I know of it, APL allows me to think about and solve a problem differently than I do in Python. I anticipate I’ll find plenty of people in the Array Languages community willing to help me if I do continue to try to learn it. They’re an opinionated, quirky, mature, gentle, yet small bunch of extremely skilled programmers, and I’m glad to have met and coded with them.