I was in Finland recently, at the European Testing Conference. I both attended the conference and presented a workshop about “Approval testing with TextTest“. I won’t say any more about that, since Ben Linders did a brilliant write-up already that was published on InfoQ. There were several other highlights, and I wanted to just share a paragraph or so about each.

Mob Testing is what happens when your development team decides to work together on testing tasks as a Mob. I took part in a workshop where Maaret Pyhäjärvi facilitated two different mobbing exercises, one where we automated some UI tests using Selenium, and one where we practiced Test-Driven Development on the FizzBuzz kata. I have already done some Mob Programming and this felt very similar, except the focus was on developing tests rather than production code. It seems to have similar benefits – you have access to all the knowledge of everyone in the team, and you can learn things you didn’t even know to ask about. It makes pairing seem like a slow way to share good working practices.

JUnit 5 is on the horizon, and has several useful improvements over the previous version. Generally the syntax clutter is reduced, and the way you create parameterized tests has been overhauled. The most significant change though, (especially for people like me who work on developing other testing tools), seems to be that they’re designing the test-running engine to be separated so you can re-use it to run other kinds of tests. Any infrastructure that works with JUnit will then be able to run these other tests as well. In principle it opens up JUnit’s success as a platform, to be re-used by other test frameworks. Thanks Nicolai Parlog for this useful summary of the next generation of one of the most widely-used tools in the Java world.

Joel Hynoski has worked at many of the tech giants in our industry, including Google, Twitter, Apple, and now Lyft. He spoke about some of the engineering challenges they had overcome, specifically in the area of testing. One thing I liked was their tool that detects flaky tests, and puts them in ‘jail’. (A flaky test is one that sometimes passes and sometimes fails, when run against the same code. They are a pain and can be a huge waste of time.) When a test is in ‘jail’, that means it’s no longer run in the build pipeline, so it doesn’t block new releases. It instead gets flagged as needing maintenance. They then have a SLA that says how long a test is allowed to remain in jail before an engineer needs to look at it and fix the flakyness – a day or two I think.

I can feel a little in awe of someone who has worked in those kinds of famous engineering organizations, working at web-scale with some of the best developers in our industry. What I found most encouraging about talking to Joel, was that he was very down to earth about the problems these organizations face. They still battle with legacy code, despite it often only being a few years old. They have trouble creating reliable automated tests. The developers don’t always trust the test automation. They still have production bugs and hotfixes…

Alex Schladebeck spent the first ten minutes of her presentation giving a splendid rant about the bad reputation of UI testing. To summarize: (criticisms she hears about UI tests -> her responses)

UI tests give slow feedback -> and valuable feedback, doesn’t have to be after every build
need more infrastructure/machines -> yes, deal with it
they’re the top of the test pyramid -> they are in the pyramid! you can’t ignore them. They find different stuff than unit tests. Consider your context.
they’re flaky -> they’re not as bad as they used to be! Could be your app isn’t designed for testabilty? Could be your test design is poor?
they cause lots of work when small changes in your app -> that happens in development work too! Also, happens more if you design them badly.

She then went on to give some excellent advice about how to design your UI tests. It was mostly about layering your test code in different levels of abstraction, and getting a good collaboration going between developers and testing specialists.

Conferences are about meeting people and the organizers of this conference had very deliberately scheduled sessions to encourage this. We had a ‘speed dating’ session where you talk to about 8 random people for five minutes each. We had a ‘lean coffee’ session, where all the speakers were each asked to facilitate a discussion table. I thought this worked particularly well as a way to find people with similar interests, and get them to talk about their experiences. The hands-on workshops were all at the same time, so you had to go to one and not just attend talks all the time. There was also an open space scheduled when it would not clash with any other kinds of sessions. I thought all this together made for a pretty welcoming conference where you were bound to get to know new people.

Overall I had a really good time at this conference and I’d recommend it to both testers and developers with a strong quality focus.

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