Posts tagged ‘Code Kata’

I’ve been working on this Kata “Gilded Rose” at a few different coding dojos lately. There is even a video of a session I did at the “Tampere Goes Agile” conference recently. In the video, you can see me talking about my Principles of Agile Test Automation, which I have just written about, and updated in my last blog post.

I think these test automation principles are useful to think about when you’re doing the Gilded Rose kata. The basic plot of the Kata is that you’ve just been hired to look after an existing system, and the customer wants a new feature. Having a look at the code, you can see you’re going to want to refactor it a little before adding the new feature, and before you do that, you’re going to want some automated tests.

So the first part of the Kata is to add automated tests to the existing code. You’ve got a requirements document the customer has given you, and you can use it to identify test cases. You’ve also got the code which you can read and execute and work out what it does. The customer is happily using the code in production right now, so you can assume that the behaviour it has is the behaviour they want to keep, whatever it says in the requirements document. (hint!)

Warning – spoilers lie ahead! You should probably try the Gilded Rose kata for yourself before reading on!

When I’ve done this exercise with various groups, I’ve spent a lot of time discussing with people how to make their test cases really readable, and express the requirements clearly, and at the same time useful as regression protection when refactoring the code later.

When you design a test suite you have two main aims – to help you understand what the code should do, (and what it does now), and protection from regression failures when you update it. It can be a bit tricky to do both with the same test suite. If you focus solely on describing the requirements in an executable way, you tend to miss edge cases and there are gaps in the regression protection. If you focus only on regression protection, you’ll spend time analysing the edge cases, and measuring code coverage to see how well you’re doing, but the test cases can become quite hard to read and understand.

You can see for yourself by comparing this test case by Bobby Johnson with this text-based approval test. (It was written by several people at a GothPy meeting). Bobby’s test case is extremely readable and expresses the requirements clearly. He’s done pretty well on the edge cases, but I think he’s missing one or two*. With the text-based approval tests, it’s not so easy to understand what the underlying business rules are, although the regression protection is very good.

When I do this kata with a group, we spend some time discussing the various test cases we’ve come up with, and showing them on the projector. When we did this last week at the Booster Conference, people commented that showing these different test cases had given them a better understanding of “readability” and “regression protection”, and many went on to improve their test suites.

Once you’re reasonably happy with your test suite, the next task is to do the refactoring and add the new feature. How useful are your test cases for regression protection? It’s very easy to make refactoring mistakes in this kata, and you will be testing your tests! You may discover while refactoring that there are more test cases that you want to add. Version control can be pretty useful, so you can run the new test cases against the original code.

There’s also an interesting restriction on your refactoring options – the “Item” class is owned by a nasty-sounding goblin and he doesn’t want you to change his code, so if you do, you have to be prepared for some serious consequences! When comparing refactored solutions at the end of the dojo, this is often an interesting discussion point – did you change the Item class? Is your new design so great that you’re prepared to argue with the goblin for it?!

I havn’t tried this, but I would actually like to try running the text-based approval test against all the refactored solutions at the end of the coding dojo, as input to the retrospective. I think this test covers all the edge cases very well, and would reveal any refactoring mistakes that were not caught by the tests people had developed themselves. That would be interesting feedback to have!

If you havn’t tried the Gilded Rose kata yourself, I do recommend it for practicing writing good test cases. I’d be happy to get a pull request from you if you want to translate the exercise into your favourite programming language, or you can do it in the original C#, as Bobby suggests.

If you’re interested in taking part in a coding dojo with me, I’ll be at several conferences later this year: ACCU in Bristol, XP2013 in Vienna and Test Automation Day in the Netherlands.

* I believe he’s missing a check that the quality of backstage passes doesn’t increase past 50

The Cyber-Dojo tool was designed by Jon Jagger as en environment where you can practice your coding skills. I’ve used it a few times now with groups at coding dojos and code retreats, and I think it’s a pretty useful tool for those contexts. (See also my last post which talks about using Cyber-Dojo during Global Day of Code Retreat).

One of the advantages of Cyber-Dojo for a Coding Dojo, (or Code Retreat), is that you don’t waste much time at the start of a coding session setting up a coding environment. The session facilitator creates a Cyber-Dojo instance in advance, and puts the practice-id up on a whiteboard or projector where everyone can see it. Participants just point their browsers at cyber-dojo.com, enter the practice-id, and very quickly get coding.

Cyber-Dojo supports about a dozen programming languages, and has starting positions set up for about 30 code katas. What is less known, is that it also allows you to set up any kata or starting position you like. I thought I’d take this opportunity to create some documentation for this feature:

  1. create a new cyber-dojo instance by going to http://cyber-dojo.com/ and pressing “setup”
  2. Select the programming language you want to use
  3. Select “Verbal” from the list of katas
  4. Click “OK”, then make a note of the “practice-id” – it’s also in the url. Press “Start” to enter this cyber-dojo instance.
  5. Edit the code files with your starting position, and update the instructions with the details of the kata exercise. Basically get the cyber-dojo instance set up to the position you want people in your Coding Dojo to start from. Run the tests as often as you like until you have everyting as you want it.
  6. Click on the “fork” icon on the left hand side to create a new cyber-dojo instance starting from this position, and note the new practice-id. You can give this id to your Coding Dojo participants.
  7. You can also publish a url that will automatically create a new cyber-dojo instance from this position, so people can create their own cyber-dojo instances. The form of the url is:
http://cyber-dojo.com/forker/fork/(practice-id)?avatar=(your animal)&tag=(number of the traffic light to fork)

I’ve used this feature to set up a number of Refactoring katas in cyber-dojo, for example the Tennis kata:

Perhaps sometime Jon will add a page on cyber-dojo.com that lists these kinds of additional available starting posistions, (hint!), but for now, you’ll have to keep track of them yourself.

By the way, do let me know if you try out this Tennis Refactoring Kata in Cyber-Dojo and how you get on with it. I welcome comments on this blog or on my github repo.

On Saturday I was up in Stockholm facilitating my fourth code retreat for Valtech, and my second Global Day of Code Retreat. It seemed to go very well. I tried out a few new elements, which seemed to make it go even better than the previous ones, so I thought I’d talk about them here in my blog.

The first thing we changed was that we had quotas for men and women, and we were aiming for a 50/50 gender balance. About a month before the code retreat, we were fully booked, with 20 places each for men and women taken. In the end several people dropped out at the last minute, and there were slightly more men. Still, it was a much better balance than last year. I think it made for a healthier atmosphere during the day, and we encouraged more women to be active in the community generally.

The second thing we changed was I didn’t require people to do Game of Life, I suggested some other code katas as alternatives. Game of Life is an excellent kata for practicing skills like writing clean code, simple design, and TDD generally. It’s also really fun to be doing an excercise that thousands of other programmers are also working on. However, I realized that around 1/3 of the people who’d signed up for the event had already been to a previous code retreat, and might be getting bored with Game of Life. We’re there to have fun, after all!

As I’ve been working on my book, and running various coding dojos recently, I’ve been thinking hard about TDD and how to learn it. It’s a multifaceted skill, and some katas allow you to focus on particular aspects of it, which can make practice more rewarding. For a complete beginner to TDD, Game of Life is actually quite hard to get started with, I’ve seen a lot of people struggling with it.  So in my introduction I highlighted four other katas people could choose from, as well as Game of Life:

  • String Calculator – good for the TDD newbie, since it really leads you by the hand
  • Tennis – good for practicing refactoring
  • GildedRose – good for practicing writing really good tests (and refactoring)
  • TyrePressure – good for understanding SOLID principles

People seemed to generally appreciate having a choice. Some pairs chose a String Calculator for their first couple of sessions, to get used to TDD, then went on to Game of Life for the others. Some pairs tried out Tennis, Gilded Rose and Tyre Pressure in the afternoon, instead of one of the other challenges. Some pairs who were already good at TDD tried out String Calculator in Clojure, and found it let them concentrate on the learning the language not solving the problem. One person, (who has been to 3 code retreats previously), didn’t do Game of Life all day, and said he really enjoyed himself and learnt loads!

The third thing we changed was that I suggested people try cyber-dojo as a coding environment. This is a tool designed by Jon Jagger as an aid to practicing your coding skills. It provides a basic editor/testing environment, and records the state of the code every time you run the tests. You can review all your changes in the session retrospective, and get a picture of how well your TDD was going.

Before the code retreat, I had set up cyber dojos for Game of Life, and Tennis. I put up the cyber-dojo ids on the whiteboard, and through the day most of the pairs tried it out for one or more sessions.

As a facilitator, I found it really helpful when going up to a pair, to be able to see the little row of traffic light symbols at the top of their screen. I could quickly get an overview of how their session was going. For example, if I see a few red-green-yellow sequences then I can infer they are probably doing ok at TDD. If I can see nothing bug a long string of yellow, then I know they’re in trouble!

For the pairs, some liked cyber-dojo because it meant they didn’t waste any time setting up their coding environment at the start of the session. For those doing Tennis, if they made a refactoring mistake, they could very easily just click on the most recent green traffic light to revert back to a known good state, and practice doing the refactoring again. Some pairs found it helpful in the retrospective to review their session in the tool.

Other pairs didn’t get on so well with cyber-dojo. Some couldn’t live without their usual editor commands. Some got confused by the lack of syntax highlighting. A couple found a bug in cyber-dojo that it lost touch with the server and stopped updating their test results, whatever they did to the code. (The workaround is to open the same url in a new window, btw).

I know Jon is aware of this bug, and I’m sure he’ll track it down, but actually the lack of syntax highlighting and editor commands is deliberate. It’s the same idea as the other challenges, like mute pairing etc – to throw you out of your comfort zone and make you really concentrate on the way you code.

So that was the three things we changed – gender balance, other katas, cyber-dojo. What we didn’t change was the overall format or aims of the day. We still paired for 5 sessions of 45 minutes, and threw away the code afterwards. We still had coding challenges like “Mute pairing with find the loophole” and “Maximum 4 line methods”, and held retrospectives after every session. I think deliberate practice in a group is at the core of what makes Code Retreat (and coding dojos!) fun and valuable. The changes we introduced were all designed to enhance the learning experience, and were based on experience and reflection after previous events.

Overall I was very pleased with all the changes we introduced, and I’d like to do it like that again. If you’re facilitating or organizing a code retreat, perhaps you’d like to introduce some of these elements too.

This Code Kata is included in my new book “The Coding Dojo Handbook”, currently published as a work-in-progress on LeanPub.com. You can also download starting code and these instructions from my github page.

As a Health Insurer,
I want to be able to search for patients who have a medicine clash,
So that I can alert their doctors and get their prescriptions changed.

Health Insurance companies don’t always get such good press, but in this case, they actually do have your best interests at heart. Some medicines interact in unfortunate ways when they get into your body at the same time, and your doctor isn’t always alert enough to spot the clash when writing your prescriptions. Sometimes, medicine interactions are only identified years after the medicines become widely used, and your doctor might not be completely up to date. Your Health Insurer certainly wants you to stay healthy, so discovering a customers has a medicine clash and getting it corrected is good for business, and good for you!

For this Kata, you have a recently discovered medicine clash, and you want to look through a database of patient medicine and prescription records, to find if any need to be alerted to the problem. Create a “Patient” class, with a method “Clash” that takes as arguments a list of medicines, and how many days before today to consider, (defaults to the last 90 days). It should return a collection of days on which all the medicines were being taken during this time.

If you like, you can also create a visualization of the clash, something like this:

medicine_clash

Data Format

You can assume the data is in a database, which is accessed in the code via an object oriented domain model. The domain model is large and complex, but for this problem you can ignore all but the following entities and attributes:

TDDStatesMoves_003

In words, this shows that each Patient has a list of Medicines. Each Medicine has a list of Prescriptions. Each Prescription has a dispense date and a number of days supply.

You can assume:

  • Patients start taking the medicine on the dispense date.
  • The “days supply” tells you how many days they continue to take the medicine after the dispense date.
  • If they have two overlapping prescriptions for the same medicine, they stop taking the earlier one. Imagine they have mislaid the medicine they got from the first prescription when they start on the second prescription.

When you’ve tried the Kata for yourself

Then you might be interested in reviewing the sample solution I’ve put up on my github page. I find this code interesting because it is seemingly well written. The methods are short with thought-through names, and there are lots of unit tests. I also find it very difficult to follow. What do you think?

The biology of medicine clashes*

When you take a pill of medicine, the active substance will be absorbed through the lining of the gut, and enter your bloodstream. That means it will be taken all over your body, and can do its work. For example, if you take a headache pill, the active substance in the drug will be taken by your blood to where it can block your pain receptors. At the same time, there are enzymes at work in your liver, which break down medicinal substances they find in your bloodstream. Eventually all the medicine will be removed, so you have to take another pill if you want the effects to continue.

In the liver, there are several different enzymes working, and they are specialized in breaking down different substances. For example, the “CYP 2C9” enzyme will break down ibuprofen, the active ingredient in many headache pills. The trouble is, there are other medicines which will stop particular enzymes from doing their work, which can lead to an overdose or other ill effects.

One example is the clash between fluoxetine and codeine. Fluoxetine is known by its trade name “Prozac”, and is often taken for depression. Codeine is another ingredient used in headache pills, and is actually a “pro-drug”, so it works slightly differently. Codeine needs to be broken down in the liver by the enzyme “CYP 2D6” into the active substance, morphine, before it will do anything. Fluoxetine has the effect of blocking “CYP 2D6”, so if you take the two medicines together, you won’t get much painkilling effect from the codeine. That could be depressing!

The solution to the problem is to take a different painkiller – one that’s not affected by that liver enzyme. Simply switch codeine for ibuprofen, and you should be be a little happier.

* With thanks to Sara Sjöberg for helping me with this section

Do you automatically get better design with TDD? Does an otherwise average software developer produce superior designs if they write the tests first rather than afterwards? Does it make a difference what style of TDD you use?

incident #1

I was at a session at XP2012 with J.B. Rainsberger called “Architecture without Trying”. He demonstrated how he could develop a software system for Point-of-Sale terminals using TDD, and how the design naturally tended towards an MVC pattern as he did it. He claimed that purely by doing TDD, and focussing on two things, (removing duplication and improving names) that a good design would naturally emerge.

incident #2

I heard a talk by Luca Minudel at Agile Testing Days 2011 called “TDD with Mock Objects: Design Principles and Emergent Properties”. He was talking about a study he had done where he got people with varying levels of experience at TDD to do four short exercises. He also got them to answer a questionnaire about their knowledge of SOLID principles, and TDD. He then evaluated how well the designs they came up with in the exercises adhered to SOLID principles, and tried to correlate that with their TDD skill. He found that the people skilled in TDD did better in the exercises than those who only knew the theory of SOLID principles. The practice of TDD seems to help people with design. Luca also found that those more experienced with the London School of TDD did even better than other TDDers.

incident #3

I was working at a client recently when I met a developer from a different department. He came to see me several times over a period of a couple of weeks, and asked for advice about TDD. On about his fourth visit he told me he had written some code and now it was basically working, he wanted to write tests for it. He said he was having difficulty since he’d written a lot of static “helper” methods. I advised him that static methods make code quite hard to test, and can often be a sign of a not very good object oriented design.

He suggested we should invest in a fancy mocking tool that would enable him to easily replace these static methods in the tests. I told him a better investment would be for him to learn to write the tests first, get better at OO design, and not use static methods in the first place. I was probably a bit blunt, and he was quite polite, all things considered. He protested that he shouldn’t have to change the production code in order to get it under test, then left. That was the last time he came to me for advice.

Discussion

So does doing TDD guarantee better design? Well it should certainly help. I’ve presented before about the way TDD gives you early feedback on your design and plenty of opportunities to refactor. It’s less help though if you don’t know what a good design looks like in the first place. I think J.B. goes too far in his claims – if you don’t know MVC or SOLID principles then I’d be surprised if they started turning up in your code with any consistency.

No tool nor technique can survive inadequately trained developers” 

(A quote attributed to Steve Freeman). I think you do need to invest in learning good design techniques independently of TDD. If you lack basic OO design skills you probably won’t be able to do TDD in the first place, London School or otherwise.

I’ve been learning and improving my practice of TDD, including the London School, for many years now, and I was intrigued by Luca’s claims that it led to better adherence to SOLID principles than classic TDD. The London School involves an outside-in approach to design, that makes heavy use of mocks to check interactions between objects. This is in contrast to a more classic TDD style that prefers to verify the code works by checking the state of an object after an interaction.  I wouldn’t claim to be an expert in the London School of TDD, but I think I understand the basics and can adopt this style when I feel the problem is appropriate for it.

I tried out Luca’s four problems, (here on github) to see how I did. Luca very kindly gave me some feedback on my code, and I found hadn’t done as well as I had hoped to in adhering to SOLID principles. I’d got the code under test, but in a few places I could have improved the design more. I also slightly misunderstood the requirements for two of the problems, which led me to fork the repo and improve the instructions 🙂

I think in the cases where I could have done better with the design, it’s possible using the London School of TDD would have led to the improvements. I’m feeling there might be something in Luca’s conjecture. On the other hand, these problems might be so small and abstract, that I didn’t behave the same as I would in a real codebase. Certainly in one case I felt it wasn’t worth extracting an interface when there was only one implementation for it. In a real system maybe it would be more obvious that more implementations were likely, and that adding the interface would lead to a more decoupled design. Or then again maybe I’m just too used to python where expicit interface classes don’t tend to be used. Or maybe I’m just making excuses! In any case, doing these exercises has made me more interested to improve my knowledge and practice of the London School TDD style. 

I think these exercises are interesting little code katas in their own right, quite apart from Luca’s study on TDD. I think you can use them to learn about the SOLID principles, and practice some of the refactorings you often have to do to get badly designed code under test.

I’m working on a python translation of the exercises so we can try them out at the Gothenburg Python User Group meeting next week. Feel free to fork the repo and have a go at them yourself.