Archive for the ‘Code Kata’ Category

When you inherit difficult code it can take weeks to become productive. Having the right tools for the job and knowing how to use them makes a huge difference. These videos show you how.

Note: this post originally appeared here https://www.praqma.com/stories/advanced-testing-refactoring-techniques/

Sometimes you don’t know what a piece of code is supposed to do, but you do know that people are using it in production, and that it in some sense ‘works’. One approach I often use in this situation is Approval testing. It can get you test coverage quickly without having to understand the code.

Since you don’t know what the code is supposed to do, you can’t define in advance what results you expect. But, what you can do is run the code, accept whatever it does as ‘correct’, then invent scenarios that will exercise all the code branches. I’ve made a video of me doing just this on some rather hairy legacy code – The Gilded Rose Refactoring Kata. With the right tools the tests fall into place relatively easily.

I’d like to credit Llewellyn Falco who showed me this way to solve this exercise.

I recorded a screencast in three parts. This is the first part.

Part 1: Introducing the Gilded Rose kata and writing test cases using Approval Tests

About the Gilded Rose code

One of the exercises I’ve used for years to help programmers improve their skills is the Gilded Rose Kata. It’s a refactoring kata – the code needs cleaning up and tests adding so you can build a new feature. That is a realistic scenario that programmers often face in everyday work, but this exercise adds a fantasy twist. The code you have to work with keeps track of various magical items stocked at the Gilded Rose establishment. The new feature concerns support for “Conjured” items that have slightly different magical properties from the other items. The scenario is just weird enough to be fun and just realistic enough to be a useful exercise.

I didn’t design the kata originally, that was Terry Hughes. I spruced up the code a little to make it a better exercise and added some extra instructions to get you going. I also translated the starting code into a few different programming languages and put it up on GitHub. In the 5 years since then I have been delighted to see how popular it’s become. I’ve had over 50 contributors chip in with various translations and improvements, and at least 800 people have forked the project and presumably had a go at the refactoring.

I think the appeal of the exercise is partly the wacky scenario it throws you into, and partly how utterly terrible the code is at the start. If you do the refactoring well it actually looks really neat at the end, which is very satisfying.

Lift-Up Conditional

When you inherit difficult code it can take weeks to become productive. I’d like to show you the difference it can make when you have the right tools for the job and know how to use them.

Once you’ve got good tests in place you can refactor much more confidently. In my previous post I showed how to get good tests using Approval Testing. I’m pretty confident in these tests, so I’ve made a second video showing some initial refactorings I’d do to get this code cleaned up a little.

One of the techniques I’m using is called ‘Lift-Up Conditional’. It’s a manipulation of a long complex conditional statement that will let you group together all the statements related to one particular conditional. I haven’t seen this particular refactoring described in the literature before – it was Llewellyn Falco who showed it to me originally. It’s perfect for the Gilded Rose code which basically comprises one big complex conditional.

The other star of this show is IntelliJ. It has a lot of automated refactorings that come together to make ‘Lift-Up Conditional’ easy and it makes really short work of cleaning up this code.

This is the second screencast in the series. My aim is to show that with the right tools and refactoring know-how you can quickly become productive with the code, even without fully understanding the byzantine business rules.

Part 2: Refactoring item logic using ‘lift up conditional’

Replace Conditional with Polymorphism

When you inherit difficult code it can take weeks to become productive. I’d like to show you the difference it can make when you have the right tools for the job and know how to use them.

Once you’ve got the code cleaned up to the point where you can see the parts of the logic that belong together, you can start to create a better class structure. A classic refactoring for this is ‘Replace Conditional with Polymorphism’ which was first described in Martin Fowler’s book ‘Refactoring’.

The basic idea is that you create subclasses to encapsulate the logic concerned with each logical case. Your design becomes much more flexible if you need to add new types that are variations on types that are already there – as in this case.

This is the third screencast in the series. My aim is to show that with the right tools and refactoring know-how you can quickly become productive with this code, even without fully understanding the byzantine business rules.

Part 3: Replace Conditional with Polymorphism


I’ve been favouring an Approval Testing approach for many years now, since I find it pretty useful in many situations, particularly for acceptance tests. Not many people I meet know the term though, and even fewer know how to use the technique. Recently I’ve put together some small exercises – code katas – to help people to learn about it. I’ll be going through them at a couple of upcoming conference workshops, but for all you people who won’t be there in person, I’m publishing them on github as well.

I’ve got three katas set up now, Minesweeper, Yatzy and GildedRose. If you’ve done any of these katas before, you’ll probably have been using ordinary unit testing techniques. Hopefully by doing them again, with Approval Testing, you’ll learn a little about what’s different about this technique, and how it could be useful.

Before you can do the katas, you’ll need to install an approval testing tool. I’m one of the developers of TextTest, so that’s the tool I’ve set up right now. Below are some useful commands for a debian/ubuntu machine for installing it.

I’m still developing these exercises, and would like feedback about what you think of them. For example I have Python versions for all three, but only one has a Java version as yet. Do people want more translations? Do let me know how you get on, and what you think!

Installation instructions

You will need to have Python 2, and TextTest. (Unfortunately TextTest uses a GUI library that doesn’t support Python 3). For example:

$ sudo apt-get install python-pip
$ sudo pip install texttest

For more detailed instructions, and for other platforms see the texttest installation docs. For more general documentation, see the texttest website.

You need to have an editor and a diff tool configured for texttest to use. I recommend sublime text and meld. Install them like this:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/sublime-text-3
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install sublime-text-installer
$ sudo apt-get install meld

Then you need to configure texttest to use them:

$ cd
$ mkdir .texttest
$ touch .texttest/config
$ subl .texttest/config

Enter the following in that file, and save:

[view_program]
default:subl
[end]
[diff_program]
default:meld
[end]

For convenience, I also like to create an alias ‘tt’ for starting TextTest for these exercises. Change directory to one of the exercise repositories, then a ‘tt’ command should start the TextTest GUI and show the tests for that exercise. Define such an alias like this:

alias tt='texttest -d python -c .'

Two of the exercises start with a small test suite for you to build on. There should be instructions in the README file of each respective exercise, to help you to get going. If you really can’t work out what to do, have a look at the sample solutions and see if that helps. These are also on github: Minesweeper-sample-solution, Yatzy-sample-solution, GildedRose-sample-solution

I’ve been interested for a while in the relationship between TDD and good design for a while, and the  SOLID principles of Object Oriented Design in particular. I’ve got this set of 4 “Racing Car” exercises that I originally got from Luca Minudel, that I’ve done in coding dojos with lots of different groups. If you’ve never done them, I do recommend getting your editor out and having a go, at least at the first one. I think you get a much better understanding of the SOLID principles when you both know the theory, and have experienced them in actual code.

I find it interesting that in the starting code for each of the four Katas there are design flaws that make it awkward to write unit tests for the code. You can directly point to violations of one or more of the SOLID principles. In particular for the Dependency Inversion Principle, it seems to me there is a very direct link with testability. If you have a fixed dependency to a concrete class, that is always going to be harder to isolate for a unit test, and the Tyre Pressure exercise shows this quite clearly.

What bothers me about the 4 original exercises is that there are actually 5 SOLID principles, and none of them really has a problem with the Liskov Substitution Principle. So I have designed a new exercise! It’s called “Leaderboard” and I’ve put it in the same git repository as the other four.

I tried it out last week in a coding dojo with my colleagues at Pagero, and it seemed to work pretty well. The idea is that the Liskov principle violation means you can’t propely test the Leaderboard class with test data that only uses the base class “Driver”, you have to add tests using a “SelfDrivingCar”. (Ok, I confess, I’ve taken some liberties with what’s likely in formula 1 racing!) Liskov says that your client code (ie Leaderboard) shouldn’t need to know if it has been given a base class or a subclass, they should be totally substitutable. So again, I’m finding a link between testability and good design.

Currently the exercise is only available in Scala, Python and Java, so I’m very open to pull requests for translations into other programming languages. Do add a comment here or on github if you try my new Kata.

Recently I became intrigued with something Seb Rose said on his blog about ‘recycling’ tests. He talks about first producing a test for a ‘low fidelity’ version of the solution, and refining it as you learn better what the solution should look like. In a follow-up post he deals with some criticisms that other posters had of the technique, but actually seems to agree with Alistair Cockburn, that it’s probably not important enough a technique to need a name. I disagree, it’s a technique I use a lot, although most often when using an approval testing approach. I prefer to call it simply iterative development. A low fidelity version of the output that is gradually improved until the customer/product owner says “that’s what I want” is iterative development. It’s a very natural fit with approval testing – once the output is good enough to be approved, you check it in as a regression test that checks it never changes. It’s also a very natural fit for a problem where the solution is fundamentally visual, like printing a diamond. I also find it very helpful when the customer hasn’t exactly decided what they want. In this kata, it’s not such an issue, but in general, quickly putting out a low-fidelity version of what you think they want and then having a discussion about how to proceed can save you a lot of trouble.

The other posters seemed to be advocating a TDD approach where you find ‘universal truths’ about the problem and encode them in tests, so you never have to go back and revisit tests that you made pass earlier. In order to take small steps, you have to break down the problem into small pieces. Once you have identified a piece of the problem and solved it, it should stay solved as you carry on to the next piece. That seems to be what I would call ‘incremental’ development.

There’s a classic explaination of the difference between iterative and incremental that Jeff Patton came up with a few years ago using the Mona Lisa painting. It’s a good explaination, but I find experiencing abstract concepts like this in an actual coding problem can make a world of difference to how well you can reason about and apply them. So I thought it would be interesting to look at these two approaches to TDD using the Diamond Kata.

I have a regular coding dojo with my team these days, so a few weeks ago, I explained my thinking about incremental and iterative, showed them Jeff Patton’s picture, and asked them to do the kata one way or the other so we could compare. I probably didn’t explain it very well, because the discussion afterwards was quite inconclusive, and looking at their code, I didn’t think anyone had really managed to exclusively work one way or the other. So I decided to try to force them into it, by preparing the test cases in advance.

I came up with some starting code for the exercise, available here. I have two sets of unit tests, the first with a standard incremental approach, where you never delete any test cases. The second gets you to ‘recycle’ tests, and work more iteratively towards the final solution. In both cases, you are led through the problem in small steps. The first and last tests are the same, the difference is the route you take in between.

When I tried this exercise with my team, it went a lot better. I randomly assigned half the pairs to use the ‘iterative’ tests, and the rest to use ‘incremental’ tests. Then after about 45-55 minutes, I had them start over using the other tests. After another 45 minutes or so I stopped them and we had a group discussion comparing the approaches. I asked the ‘suggested questions for the retrospective‘ I’d prepared, and it seemed to work. Having test-driven the solution both ways, people could intelligently discuss the pros and cons of each approach, and reason about which situations might suit one or the other.

As Seb said, ‘recycling tests’ is a tool in your developer toolbox, and doing this kata might help you understand how to best use that tool. I’d love to hear from you if you try this excercise in your coding dojo, do leave a comment.

This Code Kata is included in my new book “The Coding Dojo Handbook”, currently published as a work-in-progress on LeanPub.com. You can also download starting code and these instructions from my github page.

As a Health Insurer,
I want to be able to search for patients who have a medicine clash,
So that I can alert their doctors and get their prescriptions changed.

Health Insurance companies don’t always get such good press, but in this case, they actually do have your best interests at heart. Some medicines interact in unfortunate ways when they get into your body at the same time, and your doctor isn’t always alert enough to spot the clash when writing your prescriptions. Sometimes, medicine interactions are only identified years after the medicines become widely used, and your doctor might not be completely up to date. Your Health Insurer certainly wants you to stay healthy, so discovering a customers has a medicine clash and getting it corrected is good for business, and good for you!

For this Kata, you have a recently discovered medicine clash, and you want to look through a database of patient medicine and prescription records, to find if any need to be alerted to the problem. Create a “Patient” class, with a method “Clash” that takes as arguments a list of medicines, and how many days before today to consider, (defaults to the last 90 days). It should return a collection of days on which all the medicines were being taken during this time.

If you like, you can also create a visualization of the clash, something like this:

medicine_clash

Data Format

You can assume the data is in a database, which is accessed in the code via an object oriented domain model. The domain model is large and complex, but for this problem you can ignore all but the following entities and attributes:

TDDStatesMoves_003

In words, this shows that each Patient has a list of Medicines. Each Medicine has a list of Prescriptions. Each Prescription has a dispense date and a number of days supply.

You can assume:

  • Patients start taking the medicine on the dispense date.
  • The “days supply” tells you how many days they continue to take the medicine after the dispense date.
  • If they have two overlapping prescriptions for the same medicine, they stop taking the earlier one. Imagine they have mislaid the medicine they got from the first prescription when they start on the second prescription.

When you’ve tried the Kata for yourself

Then you might be interested in reviewing the sample solution I’ve put up on my github page. I find this code interesting because it is seemingly well written. The methods are short with thought-through names, and there are lots of unit tests. I also find it very difficult to follow. What do you think?

The biology of medicine clashes*

When you take a pill of medicine, the active substance will be absorbed through the lining of the gut, and enter your bloodstream. That means it will be taken all over your body, and can do its work. For example, if you take a headache pill, the active substance in the drug will be taken by your blood to where it can block your pain receptors. At the same time, there are enzymes at work in your liver, which break down medicinal substances they find in your bloodstream. Eventually all the medicine will be removed, so you have to take another pill if you want the effects to continue.

In the liver, there are several different enzymes working, and they are specialized in breaking down different substances. For example, the “CYP 2C9” enzyme will break down ibuprofen, the active ingredient in many headache pills. The trouble is, there are other medicines which will stop particular enzymes from doing their work, which can lead to an overdose or other ill effects.

One example is the clash between fluoxetine and codeine. Fluoxetine is known by its trade name “Prozac”, and is often taken for depression. Codeine is another ingredient used in headache pills, and is actually a “pro-drug”, so it works slightly differently. Codeine needs to be broken down in the liver by the enzyme “CYP 2D6” into the active substance, morphine, before it will do anything. Fluoxetine has the effect of blocking “CYP 2D6”, so if you take the two medicines together, you won’t get much painkilling effect from the codeine. That could be depressing!

The solution to the problem is to take a different painkiller – one that’s not affected by that liver enzyme. Simply switch codeine for ibuprofen, and you should be be a little happier.

* With thanks to Sara Sjöberg for helping me with this section